"In the Beginning, all America was Virginia."
William Byrd II
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Immerse yourself in Virginia's history by visiting one of our exhibitions.

 

The Story of Virginia

Leesburg: The Marshall House (Dodona Manor) and Oatlands Historic House & Gardens

Wednesday, June 13, 7:00am6:00pm
Members $119 (Join today)
Location:
Other
Leesburg, Virginia
Part of the Virginia Journeys category.
Part of the program.

Online reservations for this travel program are closed. If you are interested in being placed on a wait list, please contact Cathy Boe at (804) 342-9657 or at cathy@virginiahistory.org.

Join us on a members-only bus trip to Leesburg, Virginia, where we will explore The Marshall House (Dodona Manor) and Oatlands Historic House & Gardens.

The Marshall House

Photograph of Marshall House (Dodona Manor)

Formally called Dodona Manor, this eighteenth-century estate was the home of George Catlett Marshall, Jr. and his wife Katherine from 1941 until his death in 1959. Marshall served as the U. S. Army Chief of Staff during World War II and post-war was emissary to China, Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, President of the American Red Cross, and United States representative to the coronation of Queen Elizabeth. Marshall’s name is forever linked to the post World War II European Recovery Act, better known as the Marshall Plan. For this important and successful effort, Marshall received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1953.

The Marshall House is owned by the George C. Marshall International Center, which has restored the property to its Marshall-era appearance of the 1950s. It is unique among historic houses because over 90% of the furnishings and memorabilia in the house were owned and used by the Marshalls. The residence is on the National Register of Historic Places, is a National Historic Landmark, and is on the Virginia Landmarks Register.

Oatlands Historic House & Gardens

Photograph of Oatlands Historic House, Leesburg, Virginia.Oatlands Plantation was established in 1798 by George Carter, a great grandson of Robert “King” Carter of Nomini. In 1804, Carter began building a classic Federal-style mansion, which he expanded in the 1820s and 1830s. He also built a terraced garden and numerous outbuildings. The property remained in the Carter family until 1897.

In 1903, prominent Washingtonians, William Corcoran Eustis, and his wife Edith Morton Eustis purchased Oatlands as their country home. During their time at Oatlands, Edith restored the gardens to their former splendor and the mansion was upgraded with modern amenities including indoor plumbing, heating, and gas lighting. Following Edith’s death in 1964, the family donated the property to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1965.

Oatlands is a National Historic Landmark and on the Virginia Landmarks Register.  The Oatlands Historic District, which includes Oatlands Mills, the Mountain Gap School, and the Church of Our Savior, is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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